Is U.S. Crime Getting Better or Worse? It Depends on Who You Ask

By Jared Keller from Pacific Standard If you’ve paid even the slightest bit of attention to Donald Trump’s presidential campaign, you’ve heard the same message delivered over and over again: Crime in America is bad, and it’s only getting worse. “I am the law and order candidate,” Trump proclaimed at the Republican National Convention this…

Donald Trump gets a basic fact wrong about black Americans

By Simone Sebastian from Washington Post Over the course of the presidential campaign, Donald Trump has repeatedly used “inner city” as a synonym for black Americans — most recently during Sunday night’s presidential town-hall debate. When James Carter, an undecided black voter, asked the Republican nominee and his opponent, Hillary Clinton, whether as president they could be devoted…

The Ballot Is Too Damned Long

By Seth Masket from Pacific Standard I received my Colorado ballot last week. It contains nine legislative and executive races, including that for the presidency. There are also 29 judicial retention elections. And there are 15 state and local initiatives and referenda. That’s 53 elections on one four-page ballot. I don’t know what a reasonable…

One-Fifth of Americans Can’t Understand Election Predictions

By Nathan Collins from Pacific Standard People are not generally very good with probabilities. Usually, that’s not a big deal. But a new survey hints that our lack of numeracy might indirectly affect the presidential election: Around one in five Americans don’t understand what a politician’s “chance of winning” means, and the nature of their…

The Economy Is ​Great; the​ Economy Is Terrible

by Derek Thompson from The Atlantic There is an easy story to tell about the Obama Recovery. Devastated by a financial crash, the U.S. launched a historic comeback. The private sector added jobs in 73 consecutive months, the longest stretch ever. Unemployment is lower today than in the month Reagan left office. Real GDP  has…

Trump and Clinton Diverge Wildly on Questions of Science Policy

by Justin Worland from Time.com A major survey on science policy completed by Donald Trump and Hillary Clinton has laid bare a wide gap in how the two major party nominees for president would treat issues such as climate change, conservation and public health. The Republican nominee expressed skepticism at the need for the federal government…