The social lives of rich people, explained

By Christopher Ingraham from Washington Post Way back in 1983, Cyndi Lauper knew that “money changes everything.” Social science is finally starting to catch up. The latest findings, from Emily Bianchi of Emory University and Kathleen Vohs of the University of Minnesota, illustrate how having more (or less) money can radically alter the fabric of our relationships…

The Student Debt Crisis at State Community Colleges

By Sophie Quinton from Pew Charitable Trust Community colleges charge lower tuition than just about anywhere else. They’re open to everyone. They offer the kind of technical training employers want. And they can serve as an affordable steppingstone to a four-year degree. As President Barack Obama said in the fall: “They’re at the heart of…

A Drumbeat of Multiple Shootings

By SHARON LaFRANIERE, DANIELA PORAT and AGUSTIN ARMENDARIZ from New York Times  After the slaughter of nine worshipers at a South Carolina church last June, but before the massacre of eight students and a teacher at an Oregon community college in October, there was a shooting that the police here have labeled Incident 159022597.01. It happened on a clear Friday…

The Invisible Worry Work of Mothering

By Lisa Wade from Pacific Standard Way back in 1996 sociologist Susan Walzer published a research article pointing to one of the more insidious gender gaps in household labor: thinking. It was called “Thinking About the Baby.” In it, Walzer argued that women do more of the intellectual and emotional work of childcare and household…

About That Scary Swaddling Study

by ADRIENNE LAFRANCE from The Atlantic One of the more frightening risks faced by new parents—other than, you know, everything—is the prospect of SIDS, or Sudden Infant Death Syndrome, which results in some 2,000 unexplained deaths every year in the United States. So it’s understandable that a new meta-analysis that links swaddling to a higher risk…

The challenges of polling Asian Americans

BY GEORGE GAO from Fact Tank One question we’re often asked is, Why aren’t Asian Americans shown as a separate group when differences among whites, blacks and Hispanics are discussed? It’s worth noting that Asians are indeed included in our U.S. surveys. While we often do not break out their standalone views, Asians’ responses are…

The New Individualizing of Morality

By Jay Livingston from Pacific Standard Historian Molly Worthen is fighting tyranny, specifically the “tyranny of feelings” and the muddle it creates. We don’t realize that our thinking has been enslaved by this tyranny, but alas, we now speak its language. Case in point: “Personally, I feel like Bernie Sanders is too idealistic,” a Yale…