Superbugs Have Reached The U.S. For The First Time — Again

By Maggie Koerth-Baker from FiveThirtyEight Last week, an NBC News headline reported, “‘Nightmare bacteria’ superbug found for the first time in U.S.” But wait, wasn’t it already here? In 2012, headlines announced that antibiotic-resistant “superbugs” had been found in 37 U.S. states. In 2013, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention sounded “the alarm on…

The Internet Makes Us Sound Dumb

By Jared Keller from Pacific Standard Americans have always panicked over the rise of new media. In 1795, the writer J.G. Heinzmann warned that the “reading lust” that followed the rise of the novel would result in “weakening of the eyes, heat rashes, gout, arthritis, hemorrhoids, asthma, apoplexy, pulmonary disease, indigestion, blocking of the bowels,…

Where wages are worth the most and least in the U.S.

BY DREW DESILVER from Fact Tank Silicon Valley has the highest average pay in the United States – $2,069 a week, according to federal wage data. That might not be too surprising, but here’s what is: Even after factoring in the region’s notoriously high cost of living, the high-tech hub’s wages come out on top in terms of relative…

How Blacks and Whites Spend Differently

by GILLIAN B. WHITE from The Atlantic Rich Americans spend their money differently than poor Americans—no great surprise there. But the differences in how families spend go beyond earnings. For instance, rich white families spend more on entertainment and groceries than rich black families. And black families at all income levels spend more on things that require…

Europeans Face the World Divided

BY BRUCE STOKES, RICHARD WIKE AND JACOB POUSHTER from Pew Research In the wake of prolonged economic stagnation, a massive influx of refugees, terrorist attacks and a strategic challenge posed by Russia, many Europeans are weary – and perhaps wary – of foreign entanglements, according to a new Pew Research Center survey. Views of their…

Just How Easy Is It to Get People to Vote?

by By Nathan Collins from Pacific Standard If we’ve learned anything about voter turnout recently, it’s that people can be manipulated into casting a ballot. In a particularly startling example, a set of2011 experiments found that subtle differences in language can increase turnout by 10 to 15 percentage points—a result that garnered quite a good dose…

34 Years of Mass Shootings in One Chart

by Chris Wilson from Time.com See the devastating toll of mass shootings in the U.S. since 1982 No one disputes that the massacre at an Orlando nightclub early Sunday morning, which left 49 victims dead and another 53 injured, is the worst mass shooting in U.S. history. While the attack was singular in its scale,…