Geography and Life Expectancy Are Linked for Low-Income Americans

  by TANVI MISRA from CityLab Place matters when it comes to how much we earn. And how much we earn is linked to how long we’re likely to live. It is clear that place and longevity are also related—at least for the nation’s poor. That’s according to a comprehensive new study by Stanford University economist Raj Chetty and his colleagues, published Monday in the…

States Take the Lead on Juvenile Justice Reform

By Jake Horowitz from Pew Trust Ready for some good news? Juveniles in the U.S. are much less likely to be arrested for violent crime and committed to state custody than they were 15 years ago. From 2001 to 2014, the juvenile violent crime arrest rate fell 46 percent and, over roughly the same period,…

YOU ARE WHAT YOU READ

by TOM JACOBS from Pacific Standard While we may view them as universal, the ethical compasses that guide us can, in fact, vary enormously. As recent research has shown, actions seen as obviously wrong to one individual may be perfectly acceptable to another. If you are sizing up a potential partner (of either the romantic or business…

Researchers Examine Breitbart’s Influence On Election Information

from NPR A study of 1.25 million media stories says a Breitbart-centered media ecosystem fostered the sharing of stories that were, at their core, misleading. Steve Inskeep talks to researcher Yochai Benkler. STEVE INSKEEP, HOST: Researchers say they better understand how we spread around the media coverage of the 2016 election. They analyzed more than…

How Did We Get To 11 Million Unauthorized Immigrants?

by ROBERT SIEGEL and SELENA SIMMONS-DUFFIN from NPR An estimated 11 million immigrants live and work in the United States illegally. Their fate is one of the big policy questions facing the country. The story of how that population grew so large is a long one that’s mostly about Mexico, and full of unintended consequences. Prior to the…

From The BBC: The Invention of Heterosexuality

By Brandon Ambrosino from BBC The 1901 Dorland’s Medical Dictionary defined heterosexuality as an “abnormal or perverted appetite toward the opposite sex.” More than two decades later, in 1923, Merriam Webster’s dictionary similarly defined it as “morbid sexual passion for one of the opposite sex.” It wasn’t until 1934 that heterosexuality was graced with the…